Wimal Nanayakkara

Sri Lanka’s Post-COVID-19 Recovery: The Need for Inclusive Economic Growth

High levels of inequality impede sustainable growth and development of a country. Sri Lanka made impressive strides to reach an upper middle-income country (UMIC) status in July 2019, only to slip back a year later. The COVID-19 crisis, amid growing inequities, is likely to make the task of regaining UMIC status even harder. This blog highlights the main sectors and social groups that are adversely affected, and explains the need for inclusive economic growth (IEG) post-COVID-19 for Sri Lanka to emerge as a peaceful and developed country.

Education Equity in Sri Lanka: A Pathway out of Poverty

With the closure of schools following the COVID-19 outbreak and the sudden shift to online learning, poor children with no access to e-learning opportunities risk falling even further behind. In this context, some proposals made in Budget 2021 to improve the education system and reduce poverty will benefit poor children who have been disproportionately affected by the pandemic. This blog highlights some of the education-related difficulties faced by poor children in Sri Lanka based on HIES data and the recent budget proposals which could help them to overcome these difficulties.

Controlling NCDs in Sri Lanka in the Age of a Pandemic

This blog highlights the incidence of NCDs, by sex, age groups and income levels, based on the Household Income and Expenditure Survey-2016, (HIES-2016), conducted by the Department of Census and Statistics (DCS). It also discusses directions for future research on NCDs and provides recommendations to tackle the NCD challenge.

(Not) in the Same Boat: Who is Hit Hardest by the COVID-19 Wave in Sri Lanka?

The World Bank has estimated that around half a billion people worldwide could slip into extreme poverty, due to the spread of COVID-19, and subsequent control measures taken by governments. Although Sri Lanka has low levels of extreme poverty, the stringent measures taken to control the pandemic will have a devastating effect on the poor. This blog highlights the plight of the poorest and most vulnerable Socioeconomic Groups (SEGs) in Sri Lanka, during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.

Measuring Poverty within Sri Lanka’s New Reality as an Upper Middle Income Country

Sri Lanka achieved ‘Upper Middle Income Country’ (UMIC) status in July 2019, as the country’s Gross National Income (GNI) increased from USD 3,840 per capita in 2018 to USD 4,060 per capita in 2019. Sri Lanka scraped by the line of demarcation to enter the new threshold for UMICs and is still at the lower end of the spectrum. This blog presents some important points statisticians, planners, and policymakers should consider when developing methodologies and measurements to estimate poverty in Sri Lanka in the future.

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