Women

COVID-19, Work from Home, and Female Labour Force Participation: A Lesson for Sri Lanka

This blog discusses key challenges Sri Lanka faces when adopting working-from-home (WFH) as a solution to the country’s low female labour force participation (FLFP) and proposes policy solutions to overcome them. It is based on IPS’ forthcoming ‘Sri-Lanka: State of the Economy 2020’ report on ‘Pandemics and Disruptions: Reviving Sri Lanka’s Economy COVID-19 and Beyond’.

Women in Night and Shift Work in Sri Lanka: Policies to Facilitate More Participation

The types of challenges faced by women engaging in night and shift work can be very different from the challenges faced by those doing regular jobs. Many of the studies that look at increasing the labour force participation of females do not take into account the nature of available jobs and the specific challenges faced by women doing different types of jobs. A recent IPS study examined the work satisfaction and career objectives of such women as well as the challenges faced by them.The types of challenges faced by women engaging in night and shift work can be very different from the challenges faced by those doing regular jobs. Many of the studies that look at increasing the labour force participation of females do not take into account the nature of available jobs and the specific challenges faced by women doing different types of jobs. A recent IPS study examined the work satisfaction and career objectives of such women as well as the challenges faced by them.

So Sri Lanka; More like, So Where are all the Women in the Hotel Industry?

Despite its growing importance, women are highly underrepresented in Sri Lanka’s tourism sector, with females accounting for less than 10% of the workforce. Moreover, female enrollment in hotel schools in Sri Lanka is disturbingly low. These figures do not bode well in the context of a growing sector and the country’s already low female labour force participation rate. Within Sri Lanka’s hospitality sector, men are found to outnumber women in all occupational categories, except for Guest Relations and Front Office staff and Marketing functions. Thus, attracting more women into the sector will help to address the growing labour shortage, a crucial deterrent to the industry’s growth.

Greater Social Protection for Sri Lankan Women through Better Jobs: Role of Technology and Innovation

Globally, 740 million women are employed in the informal economy, with limited access to social protection. In this context, this year the United Nations (UN) celebrated the International Women’s Day (IWD), under the theme ‘think equal, build smart, innovate for change’, focusing on how countries can achieve gender equality and empower women, particularly through social protection systems, public services, and sustainable infrastructure. Sunimalee Madurawala highlights the labour market conditions that hinder social protection coverage for women and examines how technology and innovation can help increase labour market access and opportunities for women.

Women in Times of Disaster: Gender Dimension of Disaster Management in Sri Lanka

It has become apparent that natural disasters have a gender aspect, where women are often affected more severely than men. A woman’s pre-disaster familial responsibilities are magnified and expanded by a disaster, often with significantly less support and resources. The author argues that, given that women are often in a disadvantaged position in many contexts, the promotion of gender equality implies that attention need to be paid to female empowerment in disaster management.

1 2 3