Health and Human Development

Building Back Better: Reviving Sri Lanka’s Economy Beyond COVID-19

The Sri Lankan economy is likely to face a contraction in 2020 as a direct result of the COVID-19 pandemic but there is potential for this to be followed by a sharp V-shaped economic recovery. The means of navigating such a recovery path were discussed at a webinar panel discussion held last Thursday (15th October) to mark the release of the Institute of Policy Studies of Sri Lanka’s (IPS) flagship report ‘Sri Lanka: State of the Economy 2020’.

Weathering Disasters: Why it Pays to be Prepared

Disasters such as COVID-19 can significantly impede development. While it is difficult to avoid being affected by disasters, disaster preparedness can reduce the costs, and quicken the recovery.

Smoked Out: Why the Sale of Single Stick Cigarettes Must Be Banned

This month, the National Authority on Tobacco and Alcohol (NATA) announced the drafting of legislation to ban the sale of single cigarettes. It is a welcome move given that Sri Lanka lags behind 107 countries that have banned the sale of single stick cigarettes. This blog explains why the sale of single cigarettes must be banned without any further delay.

Controlling NCDs in Sri Lanka in the Age of a Pandemic

This blog highlights the incidence of NCDs, by sex, age groups and income levels, based on the Household Income and Expenditure Survey-2016, (HIES-2016), conducted by the Department of Census and Statistics (DCS). It also discusses directions for future research on NCDs and provides recommendations to tackle the NCD challenge.

COVID-19, Work from Home, and Female Labour Force Participation: A Lesson for Sri Lanka

This blog discusses key challenges Sri Lanka faces when adopting working-from-home (WFH) as a solution to the country’s low female labour force participation (FLFP) and proposes policy solutions to overcome them. It is based on IPS’ forthcoming ‘Sri-Lanka: State of the Economy 2020’ report on ‘Pandemics and Disruptions: Reviving Sri Lanka’s Economy COVID-19 and Beyond’.

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