Exports

Palm Oil Ban in Sri Lanka: Is it Sustainable?

Sri Lanka’s edible oil market has garnered considerable attention in recent weeks due to a series of events including the banning of palm oil imports in a bid to promote the local coconut industry and the detection of aflatoxins in imported coconut oil. The edible oil industry is important for Sri Lanka with oils and fats being a major constituent of the typical Sri Lankan diet and a raw material in manufacturing, the food manufacturing industry in particular. According to the latest available data, there are around 5,057 establishments employing 332,828 workers in the formal food manufacturing sector which generate an annual output of approximately LKR 1.4 billion. This blog assesses the local edible oil market and its potential for import substitution.

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Collaborative Approach is Critical for Recovery of Apparel Sector Post-COVID-19

Experts at CPD-IPS-SV international webinar on the ‘Recovery of the Apparel Sectors of Bangladesh and Sri Lanka: Is a Value-chain Based Solution Possible?’ call for suppliers, buyers, governments and international organisations to work closely together for speedy and sustainable recovery of the apparel sectors from the COVID-19 shock.

Bridging the Gap: Unlocking Untapped Potential in Sri Lanka’s Agricultural Exports

The government is giving renewed emphasis to increasing agriculture exports to manage the trade deficit and foreign debt burden. Most recently, a draft national agricultural policy has been prepared, with comments being sought from relevant stakeholders. This blog highlights gaps in the international market which the agriculture sector can target, identifies factors impeding export-sector growth in agriculture, and suggests solutions for unlocking the untapped potential in this vital sector.

Beyond Turmeric: How Import Controls are Impacting Sri Lanka’s Economy

Historically, the Sri Lankan government has resorted to import controls to counter a balance of payment crisis. The current import controls have the same underlying rationale. However, the trade deficit’s temporary shrinkage may not be sustainable if there is no increase in exports. To increase exports, Sri Lanka needs to remove hurdles on input supply, remove distortionary tariffs, exploit market opportunities under the rule-based free trade system, and in the long run, improve the country’s GVC participation.

How Technology is Shaping Apparel Sector Supply Chains in Sri Lanka: Shifting to Nearshoring and Reshoring

This blog examines the implications of tech-led supply chain changes on Sri Lanka’s apparel industry and argues that it is important to prepare early for forthcoming changes through a holistic approach, engaging a spectrum of stakeholders to improve the competitiveness of the industry. Prioritising investment in innovation and skills and improving the efficiency of business processes is critical for Sri Lanka’s apparel industry to remain competitive in the changing tech-landscape.

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