female labour force participation

Women in Night and Shift Work in Sri Lanka: Policies to Facilitate More Participation

The types of challenges faced by women engaging in night and shift work can be very different from the challenges faced by those doing regular jobs. Many of the studies that look at increasing the labour force participation of females do not take into account the nature of available jobs and the specific challenges faced by women doing different types of jobs. A recent IPS study examined the work satisfaction and career objectives of such women as well as the challenges faced by them.The types of challenges faced by women engaging in night and shift work can be very different from the challenges faced by those doing regular jobs. Many of the studies that look at increasing the labour force participation of females do not take into account the nature of available jobs and the specific challenges faced by women doing different types of jobs. A recent IPS study examined the work satisfaction and career objectives of such women as well as the challenges faced by them.

So Sri Lanka; More like, So Where are all the Women in the Hotel Industry?

Despite its growing importance, women are highly underrepresented in Sri Lanka’s tourism sector, with females accounting for less than 10% of the workforce. Moreover, female enrollment in hotel schools in Sri Lanka is disturbingly low. These figures do not bode well in the context of a growing sector and the country’s already low female labour force participation rate. Within Sri Lanka’s hospitality sector, men are found to outnumber women in all occupational categories, except for Guest Relations and Front Office staff and Marketing functions. Thus, attracting more women into the sector will help to address the growing labour shortage, a crucial deterrent to the industry’s growth.

Economically Empowering Sri Lankan Women: One Strategy Does Not Fit All

When it comes to empowering Sri Lankan women in economic terms, there are no one-size-fits-all solutions. It is important to look at the differences in women’s needs and priorities from different settings, in order to introduce more effective development efforts. On International Women’s Day, this blog analyses the issues faced by rural and urban women and discusses ways in which these women can be empowered using a variety of strategies.

Unpaid Care Work: The Overlooked Barrier in Women’s Economic Empowerment

Over 75% of the world’s total unpaid care work is done by women. However, this work is largely excluded from national income accounts and macro-economic statistics. This has led to significant gaps in economic policymaking, both in Sri Lanka and around the world. This blog argues that recognizing, reducing and redistributing unpaid care work is vital to fostering economic growth, and closing gender gaps in the labour market.

Women in the Sri Lankan Workforce: Dissecting Education and Female Labour Force Participation

Improving Sri Lanka’s female labour force participation has been an issue troubling policymakers in the recent past. Most solutions to this problem are concerned with helping women to balance work-life activities. This blog shows that low female labour force participation is more an issue for low skilled females. The labour force participation of higher skilled females is on par with that of males. As such, this blog argues that better education and better jobs will also encourage more females to enter the workforce.