Sri Lankan Economy

Empowering Sri Lankan Women: Highlights from the National Policy Conference on Women’s Access to Decent Work in Sri Lanka

The Institute of Policy Studies of Sri Lanka (IPS) recently conducted a thought-provoking discussion aimed at improving women’s access to decent work in Sri Lanka. The event, titled the ‘National Policy Conference on Women’s Access to Decent Work,’ was organised in collaboration with the Partnership for Economic Policy (PEP) and Co-Impact and took place at the Dr Saman Kelegama Auditorium, IPS.

Between Homefront Policies and Global Developments: Sri Lanka’s External Sector Outlook

Having weathered a challenging period marked by a deep economic crisis, Sri Lanka is now demonstrating positive signs of an economic upturn. Still, amidst limited homefront policy alternatives against an unfavourable global backdrop, a critical question arises: how will Sri Lanka’s external sector cope in the face of these challenges?
Notably, import controls, initially imposed in response to the dearth of foreign exchange liquidity in the domestic market, are being largely eased. The government is actively seeking to forge partnerships with regional giants, aiming to strengthen trade relations through Free Trade Agreements (FTAs). Nevertheless, in the broader global context, the rise of geopolitical rivalries, slow growth and contracting demand in key markets create multiple uncertainties for Sri Lanka’s external sector recovery.

Why Promoting Decent Work Matters More Than Just Any Job for Sri Lankan Women

Sri Lanka’s low female labour force participation rate (FLFP) has received intense policy attention over the past several decades for many reasons. It is widely assumed that improving FLFP will not only empower women and reduce gender disparities but will also promote productivity and economic growth. Over the years, a popular strategy for promoting FLFP by successive governments has been to encourage self-employment opportunities or entrepreneurship. However, FLFP has remained below 35% for years. Self-employment jobs are highly vulnerable to economic fluctuations as social safety nets do not cover them. Furthermore, on average, self-employment income is lower than other types of income. This blog argues that to empower women and drive economic growth, policy should focus on facilitating women’s access to decent work over access to any job.

Latest Edition of Talking Economics Digest Now Online! – Transitioning to a High Middle Income Economy

As Sri Lanka moves towards achieving high middle-income status, the country is faced with both challenges and opportunities. To leverage the maximum advantage presented by these favourable circumstances and overcome the obstacles, reforms are needed in almost all aspects of the economy. In this context, the 17th Edition of the Talking Economics Digest centers on the theme of ‘Transitioning to a High Middle Income Economy.’

Crunching the Numbers: What is the Real Export Benefit of GSP Plus to Sri Lanka?

Since Sri Lanka regained the EU’s GSP Plus facility last month, there have been varying views on its actual economic benefit to Sri Lanka. This article by Janaka Wijayasiri numerically estimates the export benefit of GSP Plus to Sri Lanka, identifying the leading beneficiaries in the country and their gains.