Jobs

Girls in STEM: How is Sri Lanka Faring?

Sri Lanka appears to do relatively well in terms of gender representation in the broad field of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education. However, significant gender differences in enrollments exist within STEM fields. In the context of an upcoming technology-driven Fourth Industrial Revolution, being equipped with STEM-related skills will be increasingly important to survive in the future labour market, argues Ashani Abayasekara.

The New Oil of the 21st Century: Sri Lanka’s Need for Data Scientists

The term ‘data scientist’ did not exist a little more than a decade ago. However, with the increasing rate of technological progress, the term “data scientist” is now casually thrown around in the tech realm. This blog argues that developing more data scientists can help Sri Lanka not only develop local businesses, but also earn foreign exchange.

Where have all the Typists Gone? Technology and Changing Job Profiles in Sri Lanka

Innovation and technology are rapidly transforming production in a variety of industries and reshaping occupation profiles. Some jobs are being made obsolete while there are new types of work emerging. Is Sri Lanka’s job market ready to face the challenges and leverage the opportunities presented by the Fourth Industrial Revolution? Nisha Arunatilake and Chathurga Karunanayake explore.

Improving Quality of Jobs in Sri Lanka: Can Exports be the Panacea?

Sri Lanka’s labour market has been riddled with persistent high informality, an unchanging low female labour force participation, and low quality of available jobs. Enhancing exports can be a solution to these intractable problems, according to the findings of the Exports to Jobs – Boosting the Gains from Trade in South Asia report, which shows that boosting exports improves domestic labour markets by creating jobs, increasing wages, and reducing informality.

Sending Sri Lankans and Receiving Chinese Workers: Emerging Trend of Labour Migration in Sri Lanka

The Sri Lankan economy is transitioning from a mere labour sending economy into one that both sends and receives workers. The same employment opportunities, working conditions, and demand and supply conditions that necessitated outmigration of Sri Lankans workers is now attracting foreign workers in to Sri Lanka. In this new reality, Sri Lanka needs an updated Act to govern immigration in to the country, as well as a matching institutional framework to ensure efficient and foolproof operation of related activities. In formulating such an institutional framework, it is important to note that migration transition is a long, complicated, and dynamic phase.