Development

A Comment on ‘New Educational Policies and Proposals’ for General Education in Sri Lanka

Despite impressive performance in access to education, issues of quality of education, access to higher levels of education and relevance of education has challenged the education sector in the recent past. In this regard, the initiative proposed in the New …

Biodiversity as a Cornerstone of Sustainable Development: A Sri Lankan Perspective

Marking International Day for Biodiversity today (22nd May), Dilani Hirimuthugodage looks at the Sri Lankan interventions in the wake of its ratification of the International Convention on Biological Diversity 19 years ago. She asserts that concrete steps must be taken soon if Sri Lanka is to safeguard its rich bio diversity, in the midst of the rapid development taking place.

The Role of Tax Incentives in Attracting Investment to Sri Lanka: Time for a Re-think?

Based on a new Working Paper by IPS researchers titled ‘Incentivizing Foreign Investment in Sri Lanka and the Role of Tax Incentives’, this article argues that a key medium-term challenge facing the country is to find a balance between providing a competitive tax incentives regime to attract FDI and keeping tax foregone to a minimum in order to preserve domestic revenue.

Why Public Private Partnerships Might be the Answer to Sri Lanka’s Struggling Health Care Sector

G.D. Dayaratne of the Health Economics Policy Unit of IPS writes a special feature article marking World Health Day (7th April). He argues that it is exceedingly important that the public dismisses the false notion that PPPs will lead to the privatization of the public health care delivery system. Public health authorities have a responsibility to reap the benefits from PPP arrangements, in order to reduce cost, share resources, provide quality assurance, and increase the efficiency of the healthcare delivery system without compromising on equity and fairness. Hence, institutional changes may be required in both the public and private sectors, to better fulfill their social mandate and provide quality health services to the people of the country.

Broken Promises: The Plight of Women in Sri Lanka and its Economic Costs

Marking International Women’s Day 2013 today (8th March), Sunimalee Madurawala writes on the economic costs of Violence Against Women and the urgent need for action in Sri Lanka. Sri Lanka made a promise to its women when it became a signatory to the international conventions protecting the rights of women. However this has been left on the backburner for too long and the plight of the country’s women is beginning to exert a very real economic impact on the country as a whole. Policy makers and implementers might find that it is always better to keep a promise, rather than bear the costs of a fall out.