Education, Jobs, and Youth

Sri Lanka’s Human Capital Progress: Still Less than its Full Potential

The World Bank’s Human Capital Index (HCI) summarises the ‘amount of human capital a child born today could expect to attain by age 18’. Sri Lanka’s HCI for 2018, the best in the South Asian region, is 0.58. However, there is room for improvement. A closer examination of the sub-indices of the HCI shows that two of the areas that need attention are education and health.

Education Matters: Addressing Inequities and Skills Development Gaps in Sri Lanka

As Sri Lanka enters an increasingly competitive international environment, with a renewed enthusiasm to transform itself into a modern economy, the importance of promoting technological innovations and generating an educated workforce, possessing market-oriented skills, cannot be over emphasised. High quality human resources and a skilled labour force are vital to improve the country’s global competitiveness. As such, it is important to identify the reasons for gaps in access to education and improve access to all students.

Improving Sri Lanka’s Learning Outcomes: Get the ABCs Right before Following Others!

Poor quality education systems are a main underlying cause for the ‘learning crisis’. Education systems fail to function effectively due to both ‘misalignment’ and ‘incoherence’, which, if left unaddressed, impede the effectiveness of interventions to improve learning implemented at the school and student levels. Therefore, the author argues that, countries like Sri Lanka cannot simply borrow system elements from other countries and expect them to work well in the home context, without first improving the education system.

Sub Agents and Migrants: Dissecting their Relationship to Guide Regulation

Sub Agents play a significant role in the recruitment process of migrant workers from Sri Lanka. However, to-date Sub Agents are informal stakeholders in the recruitment process. As such, currently, there is increasing interest in Sri Lanka to formalise Sub Agents and hold them accountable for their conduct. In this blog, Bilesha Weeraratne weighs in on how Sub Agents can be regulated to better serve potential migrants and licensed agents.

Regulating Inbound Migration: ‘In’s and ‘Out’s of Sri Lanka’s Policy Framework

With the recent signing of the Sri Lanka – Singapore Free Trade Agreement (SLSFTA), as well as the Economic and Technological Cooperation Agreement (ETCA) with India that is being negotiated, there has been wide public debate on the issue of allowing free movement of people across borders. Bilesha Weeraratne argues that the ability to retain skilled foreign workers, and continue to attract high-skilled migrant workers is contingent upon the development of policies that will cater to the needs of inbound migrant workers while leveraging the potential they hold to foster economic growth and development in the country.

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