Education, Jobs, and Youth

Lowering Sri Lanka’s NEETs: Need for Smoother School-to-Work Transitions

The presence of a large population of youth not in education, employment, or training (NEETs) is a major cause for concern for Sri Lanka. Worryingly, the country recorded a NEET rate of 26.1% in 2016, above the ILO global average estimate of 21.8%. In this blog, Ashani Abayasekara looks at the factors that increase the likelihood of youth becoming NEET and gives several policy recommendations to improve the situation.

Sending Sri Lankans and Receiving Chinese Workers: Emerging Trend of Labour Migration in Sri Lanka

The Sri Lankan economy is transitioning from a mere labour sending economy into one that both sends and receives workers. The same employment opportunities, working conditions, and demand and supply conditions that necessitated outmigration of Sri Lankans workers is now attracting foreign workers in to Sri Lanka. In this new reality, Sri Lanka needs an updated Act to govern immigration in to the country, as well as a matching institutional framework to ensure efficient and foolproof operation of related activities. In formulating such an institutional framework, it is important to note that migration transition is a long, complicated, and dynamic phase.

How Disability-Inclusive is Education in Sri Lanka? A Preliminary Look

Children with disabilities are often excluded from educational opportunities, and are overlooked when it comes to school completion and learning outcomes. Sri Lanka’s latest Population Census indicates that around 2% of children between the ages 5-14 have some form of disability, of which around only three-fourths attend school, compared to the near universal enrollment of other children. The author argues that, despite Sri Lanka’s well-established legislation promoting disability-inclusive education, there are large gaps between policy and practice.

Weathering the Storm: Improving Disaster Resilience of Rural Workers in Sri Lanka

Climate change and related vagaries of weather have increased the vulnerability of the Sri Lankan population to natural disasters. Rural households and livelihoods are more affected by such calamities, which increases the risk of rural families sliding into poverty. As such, Nisha Arunatilake argues that improving the quality of jobs and livelihoods of the rural population is important to build these communities’ resilience to such natural disasters.

Is Sri Lanka’s Grade Five Scholarship Exam an Accurate Predictor of Intellectual Ability?

With the grade five scholarship exam results being released recently, Ashani Abayasekara examines whether top-performing students at the scholarship exam continue to do well in subsequent exams at higher levels. She argues that, while many high scoring scholarship students continue to do well, it does not necessarily mean that the scholarship exam identifies the most intelligent students.

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