Janaka Wijayasiri

So Sri Lanka; More like, So Where are all the Women in the Hotel Industry?

Despite its growing importance, women are highly underrepresented in Sri Lanka’s tourism sector, with females accounting for less than 10% of the workforce. Moreover, female enrollment in hotel schools in Sri Lanka is disturbingly low. These figures do not bode well in the context of a growing sector and the country’s already low female labour force participation rate. Within Sri Lanka’s hospitality sector, men are found to outnumber women in all occupational categories, except for Guest Relations and Front Office staff and Marketing functions. Thus, attracting more women into the sector will help to address the growing labour shortage, a crucial deterrent to the industry’s growth.

Coronavirus Epidemic and China’s Slowdown: Economic Impact on Sri Lanka

The World Health Organisation (WHO) has declared the outbreak of the novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) as a global emergency. Amid geopolitical tensions, prospects for the Chinese economy and global economic growth have weakened further with the outbreak of the coronavirus. According to a recent paper by the Overseas Development Institute‎ (ODI) that measured which countries are susceptible to the impact of the coronavirus and the resulting slowdown in China’s economy, Sri Lanka was among the low and middle income countries which are most vulnerable to the situation.

‘A Penny Saved is a Penny Earned’: Helping Sri Lankan Workers in South Korea to Save Better

Around 28,000 Sri Lankan youth who have migrated to Korea, temporarily, since 2014, under the Employment Permit System (EPS), to work in manufacturing, construction and fisheries sectors – dirty, difficult, and dangerous (3D) jobs in the SME sector. The temporary nature of migration to Korea necessitates that policymakers in both home and host countries look at ways to help migrants maximise savings during their stay abroad.

Emerging Technologies and Trade: Can Sri Lanka Stay Ahead of the Game?

Emerging new technologies will impact trade mainly by reducing the cost of trading. These advances can cut transport and logistics costs, by optimising route planning through the use of GPS and autonomous driving capabilities, with AI applications. To leverage the benefits, while minimising the costs associated with technological disruptions, governments need to manage the structural changes brought on by technological advancements successfully. In this blog, Janaka Wijayasiri discusses what policies developing countries, including Sri Lanka, should adopt to take advantage of these transformations.

Do Not Bite Off More than You Can Chew: Single Window Implementation Process in Sri Lanka

Sri Lanka’s National Single Window (NSW), when implemented, will allow businesses to lodge information and documents with a single entry point, to fulfil all import, export, and transit-related regulatory requirements. Currently, Sri Lanka is at the beginning of the project life cycle in the establishment of a NSW, with the development of a NSW Blueprint to be released soon. In this blog, Janaka Wijayasiri deliberates on the implementation process of the NSW.

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