G D Dayaratne

World No Tobacco Day: Where Does Sri Lanka Stand?

On World No Tobacco Day, this article by G. D. Dayaratne examines the negative health issues caused by smoking, as well its impact on productivity levels of the workforce. In this context, the article discusses the effectiveness of measures taken to reduce the demand for tobacco by certain countries, including Sri Lanka.

World No Tobacco Day: Tobacco Smoking – An Issue of Un-awareness

The ‘World No Tobacco Day’ is marked on 31st May 2015. In this article to mark the day, G.D. Dayaratne takes a look at the steps taken by Sri Lanka to join the global fight against tobacco smoking.

National Medicinal Drug Regulatory Authority Bill and the Medicinal Drug Policy of Sri Lanka: Some Challenges

In this article, G D Dayaratne takes a look at the challenges in effectively implementing the National Medicinal Drugs Regulatory Authority Bill, which was passed in Parliament with amendments on 6th March 2015.

Conflicts Among Sri Lanka’s Health Workers Are Hurting Patients’ Care

All health sector workers – doctors, nurses, midwives and other paramedics – share the responsibility for delivering good health services in government hospitals. Duties and roles of these professionals are intertwined. But more recently, this ‘healthy collaboration’ has come under increasing stress in Sri Lanka, with conflicts between the different actors crippling some critical aspects of patient care. This article takes a look at this, and argues that what the health sector needs is a more collaborative and less adversarial approach.

Why Public Private Partnerships Might be the Answer to Sri Lanka’s Struggling Health Care Sector

G.D. Dayaratne of the Health Economics Policy Unit of IPS writes a special feature article marking World Health Day (7th April). He argues that it is exceedingly important that the public dismisses the false notion that PPPs will lead to the privatization of the public health care delivery system. Public health authorities have a responsibility to reap the benefits from PPP arrangements, in order to reduce cost, share resources, provide quality assurance, and increase the efficiency of the healthcare delivery system without compromising on equity and fairness. Hence, institutional changes may be required in both the public and private sectors, to better fulfill their social mandate and provide quality health services to the people of the country.