Sri Lanka
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Economic Reforms in Sri Lanka: Salvation or a Recipe for Inaction?

Vision 2025, the current government’s short and medium-term policy direction, is aimed at steering the economy towards more sustainable means of growth, led by foreign and domestic private investment. However, is Sri Lanka on the right track in this regard? This blog, based on the views expressed at New Thinkers’ Symposium, explores some key structural and institutional roadblocks that are hampering Sri Lanka’s path to progress.

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Towards a Knowledge Based Economy: Start with Quality STEM Teachers for Every Child!

Generating a high share of tertiary educated university graduates, especially in STEM subjects, is a policy priority for Sri Lanka, given the country’s goal of becoming a knowledge based economy, driving competition through innovation. Properly qualified and trained teachers are the key to achieving this target. However, Sri Lanka sorely lacks subject-qualified teachers in science and mathematics. This blog takes a closer look at the problem.

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Improving Education in Sri Lanka: Priority Areas for Action

In order to identify gaps in policymaking, and pinpoint priority areas for educational reforms, IPS recently held a Policy Engagement Forum on ‘Education and Skills for Prosperity: Building Networks for Bridging Knowledge Gaps’. This blog summarizes the insights, concerns, and recommendations shared by experts in the education sector.

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‘Lead like a Girl’: Empowering Sri Lanka’s Female Leadership

Female leadership is a widely discussed topic in today’s world – and many countries have now recognized the importance of having women in top positions. Sri Lanka, however, is sadly lagging behind in this regard. As such, this blog attempts to draw attention to some of the pertinent social and economic issues that discourage Sri Lankan women from realizing their true leadership potential.

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Where have all the Workers Gone? ‘Sectoral Mismatch’ between Labour Demand and Supply in Sri Lanka

The first ever “Labour Demand Survey” in Sri Lanka recorded nearly half a million vacancies in the private sector. A large portion of these vacancies are found to be in routine and non-routine manual jobs. However, most of Sri Lanka’s job-seekers are educated youth, searching for white-collar jobs. This blog discusses “sectoral mismatch” between the demand and supply of labour in Sri Lanka, using LDS data, and looks at ways in which it can be resolved.