South Asia

WTO Bali Ministerial: Issues and the Challenges

This article was written by IPS Executive Director Dr. Saman Kelegama and published in several local newspapers prior to the Bali talks which were held last week.   The Bali Ministerial of the WTO will commence on 3rd December 2013 …

Ensuring Migrant Workers’ Rights: Regional Frameworks Could Hold the Key

In the wake of the execution of Sri Lankan housemaid Rizana Nafeek on 9th February 2013, accused of smothering an infant in her care in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, the human rights of migrant workers have come to the forefront of the policy discussion on migration. This article discusses what the next step needs to be in developing a comprehensive governing framework for migrant labour, and argues that collective action is the strongest tool in the arsenal of sending countries in protecting migrant workers.

Rio+20: Towards a ‘Green Growth’ Path

  Rio +20 Conference is now underway and is being considered a landmark event which takes place 20 years (+20) after the first Earth Summit held in 1992. The Conference is the second opportunity to revisit the issues of “sustainable …

Facing the Fallout of a Possible ‘Grexit’ and a Euro Break-up: Time for Preparation for Developing Countries

As the European crisis led by Greece and Spain has significantly worsened over the last few months, the future of Europe seems ever more uncertain. With the decreasing possibility of a favorable outcome coming out of Europe, the impact of this crisis on the United States, China and emerging Asia is steadily increasing. Countries outside of the region have begun to plan ahead for a possible breakup of the European Union and all eyes seem to be on the EU at the moment – waiting to see how the situation will eventually manifest.

Towards Better Jobs in Sri Lanka

With the number of elderly dependents growing faster than the working age population, Sri Lanka will need to create fewer new jobs than it has historically done – just under 30,000 each year – for the next two decades. It is easier to absorb new entrants into jobs of lower productivity. However it will be more challenging, but critical, for Sri Lanka’s future success to meet its people’s rapidly rising aspirations by creating jobs of higher quality. This, then, is the crux of Sri Lanka’s employment challenge. Although the number of new jobs required to be created is less than before, their quality needs to be much better.