Schools
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Is Sri Lanka’s Grade Five Scholarship Exam an Accurate Predictor of Intellectual Ability?

With the grade five scholarship exam results being released recently, Ashani Abayasekara examines whether top-performing students at the scholarship exam continue to do well in subsequent exams at higher levels. She argues that, while many high scoring scholarship students continue to do well, it does not necessarily mean that the scholarship exam identifies the most intelligent students.

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Building a More English-Literate Sri Lanka: The Need to Combat Inequities

In today’s globalised environment, English proficiency is a must-have skill, especially when it comes to the highly-competitive job market. Unfortunately, only 22% of the age 15 and above population in Sri Lanka is literate in English. What are the reasons for this lack of English language skills? Are the government policies directed towards addressing these issues? Ashani Abayasekara explores.

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Towards a Knowledge Based Economy: Start with Quality STEM Teachers for Every Child!

Generating a high share of tertiary educated university graduates, especially in STEM subjects, is a policy priority for Sri Lanka, given the country’s goal of becoming a knowledge based economy, driving competition through innovation. Properly qualified and trained teachers are the key to achieving this target. However, Sri Lanka sorely lacks subject-qualified teachers in science and mathematics. This blog takes a closer look at the problem.

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Improving Education in Sri Lanka: Priority Areas for Action

In order to identify gaps in policymaking, and pinpoint priority areas for educational reforms, IPS recently held a Policy Engagement Forum on ‘Education and Skills for Prosperity: Building Networks for Bridging Knowledge Gaps’. This blog summarizes the insights, concerns, and recommendations shared by experts in the education sector.

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Is Sri Lanka’s Grade Five Scholarship Exam Akin to a Fool’s Errand?

The grade five scholarship examination is usually the first significant academic hurdle that most youngsters in Sri Lanka face. While children are prepared from a young age to face the exam successfully, how many manage to score above the cut-off mark each year? Does the exam serve its intended objectives of providing better schools and financial aid to bright students? Is it worth the time, money, and effort spent by young children and their parents? This blog by Ashani Abayasekara seeks to answer these questions, using data from the 2016 School Census conducted by the Ministry of Education (MOE).