Migration
IMG

Sub Agents and Migrants: Dissecting their Relationship to Guide Regulation

Sub Agents play a significant role in the recruitment process of migrant workers from Sri Lanka. However, to-date Sub Agents are informal stakeholders in the recruitment process. As such, currently, there is increasing interest in Sri Lanka to formalise Sub Agents and hold them accountable for their conduct. In this blog, Bilesha Weeraratne weighs in on how Sub Agents can be regulated to better serve potential migrants and licensed agents.

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Regulating Inbound Migration: ‘In’s and ‘Out’s of Sri Lanka’s Policy Framework

With the recent signing of the Sri Lanka – Singapore Free Trade Agreement (SLSFTA), as well as the Economic and Technological Cooperation Agreement (ETCA) with India that is being negotiated, there has been wide public debate on the issue of allowing free movement of people across borders. Bilesha Weeraratne argues that the ability to retain skilled foreign workers, and continue to attract high-skilled migrant workers is contingent upon the development of policies that will cater to the needs of inbound migrant workers while leveraging the potential they hold to foster economic growth and development in the country.

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Decrease in Remittances in 2015: Glitch or Beginning of the End?

This article to mark International Migrants Day 2016, explores the decrease in Sri Lanka’s remittances in 2015, with regard to Labour Migration, and takes a look at ways the country can maximize its remittances.

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Upfront Incentives: Carrot for Migrants & Cash for Others

This article to mark the International Migrants Day 2015, discusses the adverse implications of upfront incentive payments to migrants by focusing on the case of female domestic workers from Sri Lanka to Saudi Arabia.

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Are restrictions imposed on female migrant workers discriminatory or improving family well-being?

Female migrant workers make a vital contribution to the Sri Lankan economy, mainly through remittances. However, this economic gain often comes at a heavy social cost on the children they leave behind. This article highlights the discriminatory nature of the recent restriction on labour migration of mothers.

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