Migrants
IMG

Tipping the Balance: Are Worker Remittances to Sri Lanka Really as Large as We Think?

In 2017, foreign exchange earnings from worker remittances to Sri Lanka stood at USD 7.2 billion, well ahead of other major foreign exchange earners, while they also covered 96% of the trade deficit. Despite a few fluctuations, worker remittances to Sri Lanka have been growing over the years. At the same time, many developments in ICT and FinTech have emerged to facilitate remittance transaction. Nevertheless, whilst simplifying and making remitting more efficient, these developments have made remittances even more complicated.

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Sending Sri Lankans and Receiving Chinese Workers: Emerging Trend of Labour Migration in Sri Lanka

The Sri Lankan economy is transitioning from a mere labour sending economy into one that both sends and receives workers. The same employment opportunities, working conditions, and demand and supply conditions that necessitated outmigration of Sri Lankans workers is now attracting foreign workers in to Sri Lanka. In this new reality, Sri Lanka needs an updated Act to govern immigration in to the country, as well as a matching institutional framework to ensure efficient and foolproof operation of related activities. In formulating such an institutional framework, it is important to note that migration transition is a long, complicated, and dynamic phase.

IMG

Did the Blue-Green Budget Forget Migrants and their “Greenbacks”?

While Sri Lanka’s 2018 Budget was applauded on many fronts, Bilesha Weeraratne argues that it has ignored an important aspect of the country’s economy: migrants’ remittances. Annually, over 250,000 Sri Lankans leave for foreign employment. Yet, the proposed Blue-Green Budget had no reference to remittances, nor the migrant workers who send them home. Does this mean migration and remittances are not priorities of the Sri Lankan economy?

migrants

Upfront Incentives: Carrot for Migrants & Cash for Others

This article to mark the International Migrants Day 2015, discusses the adverse implications of upfront incentive payments to migrants by focusing on the case of female domestic workers from Sri Lanka to Saudi Arabia.