female labour force participation
IMG

Women in the Sri Lankan Workforce: Dissecting Education and Female Labour Force Participation

Improving Sri Lanka’s female labour force participation has been an issue troubling policymakers in the recent past. Most solutions to this problem are concerned with helping women to balance work-life activities. This blog shows that low female labour force participation is more an issue for low skilled females. The labour force participation of higher skilled females is on par with that of males. As such, this blog argues that better education and better jobs will also encourage more females to enter the workforce.

IMG

Human Development: Sri Lanka’s Achievements and Challenges

While Sri Lanka has been performing impressively with regard to human development, especially in terms of health and education, there are still a few major concerns that need urgent attention. This article by Wimal Nanayakkara examines the ways in which these concerns can be addressed to achieve better levels of human development and living standards.

IMG 2

The Dwindling Stitching Hands: Labour Shortages in the Apparel Industry in Sri Lanka

The apparel industry has been a key contributor of the Sri Lankan economy and a major job creator for women over the years. However, there is an increasing difficulty in recruiting women into the industry, especially at the lower levels, leading to a crippling labour shortage in the industry. This article by Sunimalee Madurawala examines the key reasons behind the issue and gives policy recommendations to attract women to the apparel sector.

Source: http://blogs.worldbank.org/jobs/psd/young-women-and-work-international-womens-day

Women’s Labour Force Participation in Sri Lanka: An Inquiry into the Key Social and Cultural Constraints

Social and cultural norms and practices continue to impede the full and equal participation of women in the labour market. On February 20th, the World Day of Social Justice, this article will examine the key socio-cultural constraints to female labour force participation and provide recommendations aimed at tapping into the full economic potential that women to stimulate growth in Sri Lanka.