Education, Jobs, and Youth
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How Disability-Inclusive is Education in Sri Lanka? A Preliminary Look

Children with disabilities are often excluded from educational opportunities, and are overlooked when it comes to school completion and learning outcomes. Sri Lanka’s latest Population Census indicates that around 2% of children between the ages 5-14 have some form of disability, of which around only three-fourths attend school, compared to the near universal enrollment of other children. The author argues that, despite Sri Lanka’s well-established legislation promoting disability-inclusive education, there are large gaps between policy and practice.

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Weathering the Storm: Improving Disaster Resilience of Rural Workers in Sri Lanka

Climate change and related vagaries of weather have increased the vulnerability of the Sri Lankan population to natural disasters. Rural households and livelihoods are more affected by such calamities, which increases the risk of rural families sliding into poverty. As such, Nisha Arunatilake argues that improving the quality of jobs and livelihoods of the rural population is important to build these communities’ resilience to such natural disasters.

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Is Sri Lanka’s Grade Five Scholarship Exam an Accurate Predictor of Intellectual Ability?

With the grade five scholarship exam results being released recently, Ashani Abayasekara examines whether top-performing students at the scholarship exam continue to do well in subsequent exams at higher levels. She argues that, while many high scoring scholarship students continue to do well, it does not necessarily mean that the scholarship exam identifies the most intelligent students.

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Sri Lanka’s Human Capital Progress: Still Less than its Full Potential

The World Bank’s Human Capital Index (HCI) summarises the ‘amount of human capital a child born today could expect to attain by age 18’. Sri Lanka’s HCI for 2018, the best in the South Asian region, is 0.58. However, there is room for improvement. A closer examination of the sub-indices of the HCI shows that two of the areas that need attention are education and health.

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Education Matters: Addressing Inequities and Skills Development Gaps in Sri Lanka

As Sri Lanka enters an increasingly competitive international environment, with a renewed enthusiasm to transform itself into a modern economy, the importance of promoting technological innovations and generating an educated workforce, possessing market-oriented skills, cannot be over emphasised. High quality human resources and a skilled labour force are vital to improve the country’s global competitiveness. As such, it is important to identify the reasons for gaps in access to education and improve access to all students.